WWI 1929 Robert Graves GOODBYE TO ALL THAT Ypres SOMME Loos ROYAL WELCH FUSILIER

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Seller: Top-Rated Seller dilapsus (6.947) 100%, Location: Flamborough, Bridlington, Ships to: Americas, Europe, Asia, AU, Item: 381952199583 Goodbye To All That An Autobiography by Robert Graves This is the 1929 Second State of the First Edition (with missing end-papers) : please see the note below regarding the printing history. Front cover and spine Further images of this book are shown below Publisher and place of publication Dimensions in inches (to the nearest quarter-inch) London: Jonathan Cape 5¼ inches wide x 8¼ inches tall Edition Length 1929 First Edition (Second State) : please see the note below regarding the printing history 448 pages Condition of covers Internal condition Original red cloth gilt. The covers are scuffed, rubbed and slightly marked with some variation in colour (particularly along the area adjacent to the front spine gutter), while the covers have bowed out slightly. The spine has darkened, with noticeable variation in colour, and there is a slight forward spine lean. The spine ends and corners are heavily bumped, with some small tears in the cloth, particularly at the spine ends. There is a bookplate ("Keith Roberts 1957") on the front pastedown. The inner hinges are badly cracked, resulting in the loss of bother front and rear free end-papers. Additionally, some of the pastedown end-paper has also been removed, while the Half-Title page and final page of text are severely tanned. This can be seen in the two images below. A previous owner has attempted to repair the front hinge with glue but this has caused part of the inside edge of the portrait frontispiece to adhere to the Title-Page (please see the image below). The text is clean throughout; however, the paper has tanned with age, more noticeably in the margins. The top corners have a shallow diagonal crease as a result of the external bumping to the covers. The edge of the text block is dust-stained. Dust-jacket present? Other comments No This is the First Edition (Second State), with the offending pages removed (please see the note below) and replacement pages tipped-in. The covers are in fairly well-used condition but still quite reasonable; however, internally, the inner hinges are badly cracked with some loss from the pastedown end-papers and the front and rear free end-papers missing. Illustrations, maps, etc Contents Please see below for details There are thirty-two chapters and an Epilogue Post & shipping information Payment options The packed weight is approximately 800 grams. Full shipping/postage information is provided in a panel at the end of this listing. Payment options : UK buyers: cheque (in GBP), debit card, credit card (Visa, MasterCard but not Amex), PayPal International buyers: credit card (Visa, MasterCard but not Amex), PayPal Full payment information is provided in a panel at the end of this listing. Goodbye To All That List of Illustrations Robert Graves, 1929 Cuinchy Brick-stacks seen from a British trench on the Givenchy canal-bank. The white placarded brick-stack is in the British support line; the ones beyond are held by the Germans. The village of Auchy is seen in the distance. {By courtesy of the Imperial War Museum.) Trench Map showing the Cambrin-Cuinchy-Vermelles Trench Sector in the Summer of 1915. Each square-side measures 500 yards and is ticked off into 50-yard units. Only the German trench-system is shown in detail; a broken pencil-line marks the approximate course of the British front trench. The mine-craters appear as stars in No Man's Land. The brick-stacks in the German line appear as minute squares; those held by the British are not marked. The intended line of advance of the 19th Brigade on September 25th is shown in pencil on this map, which is the one that I carried on that day Maps. (Reproduced by the courtesy of the Imperial War Museum.) Somme Trench Map - The Fricourt Sector, 1916. This map fits against the map facing page 262 Somme Trench Map - Mametz Wood and High Wood, 1916. This map fits against the map facing page 246 Robert Graves, from a pastel by Eric Kennington Various Records, mostly self-explanatory. The Court of Inquiry mentioned in the bottom left-hand message was to decide whether the wound of a man in the Public Schools Battalion - a rifle-shot through his foot - was self-inflicted or accidental. It was self-inflicted. B. Echelon meant the part of the battalion not in the trenches. Idol was the code-name for the Second Battalion the Royal Welch Fusiliers. The notebook leaf is the end of my 1915 diary only three weeks after I began it; I used my letters home as a diary after that. The message about Sergeant Varcoe was from Captain Samson shortly before his death; I was temporarily attached to his company 1929, The Second Battalion the Royal Welch Fusiliers back to pre-war soldiering. The regimental Royal goat, the regimental goat-major and the regimental pioneers (wearing white leather aprons and gauntlets-a special regimental privilege) on church parade at Wiesbaden on the Rhine. The band follows, regimentally. The goat has a regimental number and draws rations like a private soldier. 'Some speak of Alexander, and some of Hercules. . . .' Goodbye To All That Extract 23rd May. - We did company drill in the morning. Afterwards Jones-Bateman and I lay on the warm grass and watched the aeroplanes flying above the trenches pursued by a trail of white shrapnel puff's. In the evening I was detailed to take out a working-party to Vermelles les Noyelles to work on a second line of defence - trench digging and putting up barbed wire under an R.E. officer. But the ground was hard and the men were tired out when they got back about two o'clock in the morning. They sang songs all the way home . . . This is what happened the other day. Two young miners, in another company, disliked their sergeant, who had a down on them and gave them all the most dirty and dangerous jobs. When they were in billets he crimed them for things they hadn't done. So they decided to kill him. Later they reported at Battalion Orderly Room and asked to see the adjutant. This was irregular, because a private is not allowed to speak to an officer without an N.C.O. of his own company to act as go-between. The adjutant happened to see them and said: 'Well, what is it you want?' Smartly slapping the small-of-the-butt of their sloped rifles they said: 'We've come to report, sir, that we are very sorry but we've shot our company sergeant-major.' The adjutant said: 'Good heavens, how did that happen?' They answered: 'It was an accident, sir.' 'What do you mean? Did you mistake him for a German?' 'No, sir, we mistook him for our platoon sergeant.' So they were both shot by a firing squad of their own company against the wall of a convent at Bethune. Their last words were the battalion rallying-cry: 'Stick it, the Welsh!' (They say that a certain Captain Haggard first used it in the battle of Ypres when he was mortally wounded.) The French military governor was present at the execution and made a little speech saying how gloriously British soldiers can die. You would be surprised at the amount of waste that goes on in trenches. Ration biscuits are in general use as fuel for boiling up dixies, because fuel is scarce. Our machine-gun crews boil their hot water by firing off belt after belt of machine-gun ammunition at no particular target, just generally spraying the German line. After several pounds' worth of ammunition has been used, the water in the guns — they are water-cooled - begins to boil. They say they make German ration and carrying parties behind the line pay for their early-morning cup of tea. But the real charge will be on income-tax after the war. 24th May. — To-morrow we return to trenches. The men are pessimistic but cheerful. They all talk about getting a 'cushy' one to send them back to 'Blitey.' Blitey is, it seems, Hindustani for 'home.' My servant, Fry, who works in a paper-bag factory at Cardiff in civil life, has been telling me stories about cushy ones. Here are two of them. 'A bloke in the Munsters once wanted a cushy, so he waves his hand above the parapet to catch Fritz's attention. Nothing doing. He waves his arms about for a couple of minutes. Nothing doing, not a shot. He puts his elbows on the fire-step, hoists his body upside down and waves his legs about till he get blood to the head. Not a shot did old Fritz fire. "Oh," says the Munster man, "I don't believe there's a damn squarehead there. Where's the German army to?" He has a peek over the top — crack! he gets it in the head. Finee.' Another story: 'Bloke in the Camerons wanted a cushy bad. Fed up and far from home, he was. He puts his hand over the top and gets his trigger finger taken off, and two more beside. That done the trick. He comes laughing through our lines by the old boutillery. "See, lads," he says, "I'm aff to bony Scotland. Is it na a beauty?" But on the way down the trench to the dressing-station he forgets to stoop low where the old sniper was working. He gets it through the head too. Finee. We laugh fit to die.' To get a cushy one is all that the old hands think of. Only twelve men have been with the battalion from the beginning and they are all transport men except one, Beaumont, a man in my platoon. The few old hands who went through the last fight infect the new men with pessimism; they don't believe in the war, they don't believe in the staff. But at least they would follow their officers anywhere, because the officers happen to be a decent lot. They look forward to a battle because a battle gives more chances of a cushy one, in the legs or arms, than trench warfare. In trench warfare the proportion of head wounds is much greater. Haking commands this division. He's the man who wrote the standard textbook, Company Training. The last shows have not been suitable ones for company commanders to profit by his directions. He's a decent man; he came round this morning to an informal inspection of the battalion and shook hands with the survivors. There were tears in his eyes. Sergeant Smith swore half-aloud: 'Bloody lot of use that is, busts up his bloody division and then weeps over what's bloody left.' Well, it was nothing to do with me . . . Goodbye To All That Printing History The elusive First Edition, First State of Goodbye To All That, which was published by Jonathan Cape in late 1929, included a poem Siegfried Sassoon had originally written to Graves (in 1918) in rhyming letter form, and which appeared on pages 341-343. Sassoon was mortified by this inclusion and demanded the recall of the edition. As he informed an acquaintance in November 1929, “I deeply resent his printing my verse letter to him & shall threaten Cape with legal action (for breach of copyright) unless he undertakes to cut it out”. The book was immediately withdrawn (but not before a few copies of the First State had found their way into private hands), and the offending pages were excised, as was an anti-War passage on page 290. Both these passages were replaced with asterisks in the reissued November 1929 First Edition (Second State). An erratum slip was also tipped in to page 399 where Graves had been in error concerning the "Rupert Brooke Fund". Ironically, with regard to the excised poem, according to one Sassoon scholar, “these honest, fearful and touching lines are some of the best Sassoon ever wrote”. The book was then stated in its Second State and was an immediate success, providing enough funds, despite the subsequent Depression, for Graves to leave Britain. There is clear evidence that, rather than re-set the book, some at least of the withdrawn volumes were hastily amended by the simple expedient of physically removing the offending pages and pasting in replacement pages. However, as the book proved popular enough to warrant reprinting, by the time of the November 1929 Third Impression (and subsequent impressions), the latter section of the text had been reset, reducing the overall page count from 448 to 446. Please note: to avoid opening the book out, with the risk of damaging the spine, some of the pages were slightly raised on the inner edge when being scanned, which has resulted in some blurring to the text and a shadow on the inside edge of the final images. Colour reproduction is shown as accurately as possible but please be aware that some colours are difficult to scan and may result in a slight variation from the colour shown below to the actual colour. In line with eBay guidelines on picture sizes, some of the illustrations may be shown enlarged for greater detail and clarity. A previous owner has attempted to repair the front hinge with glue but this has caused part of the inside edge of the portrait frontispiece to adhere to the Title-Page (please see the image below). There is a bookplate ("Keith Roberts 1957") on the front pastedown. The inner hinges are badly cracked, resulting in the loss of bother front and rear free end-papers. Additionally, some of the pastedown end-paper has also been removed, while the Half-Title page and final page of text are severely tanned. This can be seen in the two images below. The First Edition First State of Goodbye To All That included a poem Siegfried Sassoon had originally written to Graves (in 1918) in rhyming letter form, and which appeared on pages 341-343. Sassoon demanded the recall of the edition. The book was immediately withdrawn (but not before a few copies of the First State had found their way into private hands), and the offending pages were excised, as was an anti-War passage on page 290. Both these passages were replaced with asterisks in the reissued November 1929 First Edition Second State. An erratum slip was also tipped in to page 399 where Graves had been in error concerning the "Rupert Brooke Fund". This can be seen in the images below: IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR PROSPECTIVE BUYERS U.K. buyers: To estimate the “packed weight” each book is first weighed and then an additional amount of 150 grams is added to allow for the packaging material (all books are securely wrapped and posted in a cardboard book-mailer). The weight of the book and packaging is then rounded up to the nearest hundred grams to arrive at the postage figure. I make no charge for packaging materials and do not seek to profit from postage and packaging. Postage can be combined for multiple purchases. Packed weight of this item : approximately 800 grams Postage and payment options to U.K. addresses: Details of the various postage options (for example, First Class, First Class Recorded, Second Class and/or Parcel Post if the item is heavy) can be obtained by selecting the “Postage and payments” option at the head of this listing (above). Payment can be made by: debit card, credit card (Visa or MasterCard, but not Amex), cheque (payable to "G Miller", please), or PayPal. Please contact me with name, address and payment details within seven days of the end of the auction; otherwise I reserve the right to cancel the auction and re-list the item. Finally, this should be an enjoyable experience for both the buyer and seller and I hope you will find me very easy to deal with. If you have a question or query about any aspect (postage, payment, delivery options and so on), please do not hesitate to contact me, using the contact details provided at the end of this listing. International buyers: To estimate the “packed weight” each book is first weighed and then an additional amount of 150 grams is added to allow for the packaging material (all books are securely wrapped and posted in a cardboard book-mailer). The weight of the book and packaging is then rounded up to the nearest hundred grams to arrive at the shipping figure. I make no charge for packaging materials and do not seek to profit from shipping and handling. Shipping can usually be combined for multiple purchases (to a maximum of 5 kilograms in any one parcel with the exception of Canada, where the limit is 2 kilograms). Packed weight of this item : approximately 800 grams International Shipping options: Details of the postage options to various countries (via Air Mail) can be obtained by selecting the “Postage and payments” option at the head of this listing (above) and then selecting your country of residence from the drop-down list. For destinations not shown or other requirements, please contact me before buying. Tracked and "Signed For" services are also available if required, but at an additional charge to that shown on the Postage and payments page, which is for ordinary uninsured Air Mail delivery. Due to the extreme length of time now taken for deliveries, surface mail is no longer a viable option and I am unable to offer it even in the case of heavy items. I am afraid that I cannot make any exceptions to this rule. Payment options for international buyers: Payment can be made by: credit card (Visa or MasterCard, but not Amex) or PayPal. I can also accept a cheque in GBP [British Pounds Sterling] but only if drawn on a major British bank. Regretfully, due to extremely high conversion charges, I CANNOT accept foreign currency : all payments must be made in GBP [British Pounds Sterling]. This can be accomplished easily using a credit card, which I am able to accept as I have a separate, well-established business, or PayPal. Please contact me with your name and address and payment details within seven days of the end of the auction; otherwise I reserve the right to cancel the auction and re-list the item. Finally, this should be an enjoyable experience for both the buyer and seller and I hope you will find me very easy to deal with. If you have a question or query about any aspect (shipping, payment, delivery options and so on), please do not hesitate to contact me, using the contact details provided at the end of this listing. Prospective international buyers should ensure that they are able to provide credit card details or pay by PayPal within 7 days from the end of the auction (or inform me that they will be sending a cheque in GBP drawn on a major British bank). Thank you. (please note that the book shown is for illustrative purposes only and forms no part of this auction) Book dimensions are given in inches, to the nearest quarter-inch, in the format width x height. Please note that, to differentiate them from soft-covers and paperbacks, modern hardbacks are still invariably described as being ‘cloth’ when they are, in fact, predominantly bound in paper-covered boards pressed to resemble cloth. Fine Books for Fine Minds I value your custom (and my feedback rating) but I am also a bibliophile : I want books to arrive in the same condition in which they were dispatched. For this reason, all books are securely wrapped in tissue and a protective covering and are then posted in a cardboard container. If any book is significantly not as described, I will offer a full refund. Unless the size of the book precludes this, hardback books with a dust-jacket are usually provided with a clear film protective cover, while hardback books without a dust-jacket are usually provided with a rigid clear cover. The Royal Mail, in my experience, offers an excellent service, but things can occasionally go wrong. However, I believe it is my responsibility to guarantee delivery. If any book is lost or damaged in transit, I will offer a full refund. Thank you for looking. Please also view my other listings for a range of interesting books and feel free to contact me if you require any additional information Design and content © Geoffrey Miller Condition: A detailed description of this item's current condition is given in the listing below but please do not hesitate to contact me (gm@flamboroughmanor.co.uk) if you require any further information., Non-Fiction Subject: History & Military, Binding: Hardback, Language: English, Place of Publication: London, Year Printed: 1929, Author: Robert Graves, Publisher: Jonathan Cape

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