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Seller: ancientgifts (4.674) 100%, Location: Ferndale, Washington, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 383103924129 When ordering from the US, parcels may be subject to import tax and duty charges, which the buyer is responsible to pay. Maker and Muse: Women and Early Twentieth Century Art Jewelry by Elyse Zorn Karlin. NOTE: We have 75,000 books in our library, almost 10,000 different titles. Odds are we have other copies of this same title in varying conditions, some less expensive, some better condition. We might also have different editions as well (some paperback, some hardcover, oftentimes international editions). If you don’t see what you want, please contact us and ask. We’re happy to send you a summary of the differing conditions and prices we may have for the same title. DESCRIPTION: Hardcover with dustjacket. Publisher: The Monacelli Press (2015). Pages: 256. Size: 9½ x 9 x 1 inch; 3 pounds. A new perspective on woman’s role in the world of art jewelry at the turn of the twentieth century—from Art Nouveau in France and the Arts and Crafts movement in Britain, to Jugendstil in Germany and Austria, Louis Comfort Tiffany in New York, and American Arts and Crafts in Chicago - and the most extensive survey to date of the sheer diversity and beauty of art jewelry during this period. Accompanying a groundbreaking exhibition at The Richard H. Driehaus Museum in Chicago, this lavishly illustrated catalog showcases nearly two hundred stunning pieces from the Driehaus Collection and prominent national collections, many of which have never been seen by the public. Women were not only the intended wearers of art jewelry during the early twentieth century, but also an essential part of its creation. Their work—boldly artistic, exquisitely detailed, hand wrought, and inspired by nature—is now widely sought after by collectors and museums alike. From the world’s first independent female jewelry makers, to the woman as artistic motif, this jewelry reflected rapid changes in definitions of femininity and social norms. Essays by noted scholars explore five different areas of jewelry design and fabrication, and discuss the important female figures and historic social milieu associated with these movements—from the suffragists and the Rational Dress Society in England; to the Wiener Werkstätte and Gustav Klimt; and the Art Nouveau masters René Lalique and Alphonse Mucha, who depicted otherworldly women in jewelry for equally fascinating patrons like Sarah Bernhardt. The essays are illustrated by historic photographs and decorative arts of the period as well as the extraordinary pieces themselves: hair combs, bracelets, brooches, and tiaras executed in moonstones, translucent horn, enamel, opals, aquamarines, and much more. As Driehaus writes in his introduction to Maker & Muse, “Essential as these elements are, the metal and gemstones of a necklace—or a brooch or a bracelet—are like a canvas. It is the designer who evokes true greatness, beauty, and value from them. Neither monumental nor mass-produced, the object contains a memory of a particular artist’s skilled hand.” CONDITION: NEW. New hardcover w/dustjacket. The Monacelli Press (2015) 256 pages. Still in manufacturer's wraps. Unblemished, unmarked, pristine in every respect. Pages are pristine; clean, crisp, unmarked, unmutilated, tightly bound, unambiguously unread. Satisfaction unconditionally guaranteed. In stock, ready to ship. No disappointments, no excuses. PROMPT SHIPPING! HEAVILY PADDED, DAMAGE-FREE PACKAGING! Selling rare and out-of-print ancient history books on-line since 1997. We accept returns for any reason within 14 days! #8347a. PLEASE SEE DESCRIPTIONS AND IMAGES BELOW FOR DETAILED REVIEWS AND FOR PAGES OF PICTURES FROM INSIDE OF BOOK. PLEASE SEE PUBLISHER, PROFESSIONAL, AND READER REVIEWS BELOW. PUBLISHER REVIEWS: REVIEW: With exquisite pieces drawn from the Driehaus Collection and major museum collections across the US, Maker and Muse surveys the international approach to art jewelry at the turn of the twentieth century, a time of radical change in design approach and in the role of women. Authoritative essays by noted scholars explore the development of this movement in England through the British Arts and Crafts, in France through Art Nouveau, in Germany and Austria through Jugenstil and particularly Wiener Werkstatte, and in the United States through the work of Tiffany Studios in New York and American Arts and Crafts in Chicago. Looking specifically at the art jewelry, women participated and were perceived differently in each society-as makers in England and America, as unattainable abstract figures in France, and as living models in Germany and Austria. The pieces have distinct characteristics depending on their origin, but they share a common bond of exquisite craftsmanship executed in precious metals and richly colored enamels and stones. REVIEW: Women and Art Jewelry. The first book to explore the role of women, both as inspiration and as designers, in the multiple international art movements that produced unique and sumptuous pieces of handcrafted jewelry between 1890 and 1920. REVIEW: Elyse Zorn Karlin, curator of Maker & Muse, is a jewelry historian and co-director of the Association for the Study of Jewelry & Related Arts. She is freelance curator and author of several books on historical jewelry. Emily Banis Stoehrer is the Rita J. Kaplan and Susan B. Kaplan Curator of Jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. She was the co-curator of “Hollywood Glamour: Fashion and Jewelry for the Silver Screen” (2014) at the MFA. Sharon Darling is a retired curator and museum director with a special interest in Chicago decorative arts. She curated the seminal exhibition “Chicago Silver” and authored the accompanying book, which presented new research on the Chicago Arts and Crafts movement. Jeannine Falino is an independent curator, a museum consultant, and an adjunct curator at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York. She was co-curator of the recent exhibition “Gilded New York: Design, Fashion & Society” (2013) at the Museum of the City of New York. Yvonne Markowitz is the Rita J. Kaplan and Susan B. Kaplan Curator Emerita at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Among her publications are “American Luxury: Jewels from the House of Tiffany” and “Imperishable Beauty: Art Nouveau Jewelry”. Janis Staggs is Associate Curator at Neue Galerie New York. In 2008 she curated “Wiener Werkstätte Jewelry”; the first exhibition on the topic held in the United States, and authored the companion book. REVIEW: CONTENTS: Foreword by Richard H. Driehaus. Maker and Muse by Women and Art Jewelry 1890-1920 by Elyse Zorn Karlin. With A Hammer In Her Hand: Women and the British Arts and Crafts Movement by Elyse Zorn Karlin. Jewelry as Art: Germany and Austria in the Early Twentieth Century by Janis Staggs. Metamorphosis: The Female Figure in Art Nouveau by Yvonne J. Markowitz and Emily Banis Stoehrer. Jewelry by Louis Comfort Tiffany and his "Tiffany Girls" by Jeannine Falino. Beautiful, Useful, and Enduring: Chicago Arts and Crafts Jewelry by Sharon S. Darling. Bibliography. Indes. PROFESSIONAL REVIEWS: REVIEW: Maker & Muse is comprised of works drawn from the Collection of Richard H. Driehaus and prominent private and public collections throughout the United States. Driehaus Museum founder and art collector Richard H. Driehaus began acquiring Art Nouveau and Arts and Crafts jewelry in the 1990s and has never publicly shown his collection before. Additional pieces are being loaned from museums and private collectors from across the country including the Newark Museum, Tiffany & Co. Archives, and the Chicago History Museum. The exhibition features more than 250 stunning pieces of jewelry created between the late Victorian Era and World War I. During this vibrant period, jewelry makers in the world’s centers of design created audacious new styles in response to the growing industrialization of the world and the changing role of women in society. Their work—boldly artistic, exquisitely detailed, hand wrought, and inspired by nature—became known as art jewelry. "The urge for a new aesthetic emerged simultaneously in many countries at the turn of the century,” says Elyse Zorn Karlin, Exhibition Curator. “Art jewelry styles are as unique to the regions in which they were created, but together were defined by a rebellion against the strictures of the past and a look toward an exciting, less-encumbered future. This exhibition is the most extensive look to date of the sheer diversity and beauty of art jewelry during this period, and offers a new and groundbreaking perspective on woman’s role within that world.” Women were not only the intended wearers of art jewelry during the early twentieth century, but an essential part of its creation. From the world’s first independent female jewelry makers to the woman as artistic motif, the art jewelry of the new century reflected rapid changes in definitions of femininity and social norms. Exemplary examples of necklaces, brooches, bracelets, pins, rings, jeweled and enameled boxes, pendants, buckles, cloak clasps, accessories, and tiaras are featured in Maker & Muse. Each of the Museum’s second-floor galleries is devoted to jewelry showcasing the five areas of design and fabrication: the Arts and Crafts Movement in Britain, Art Nouveau in France and Belgium, Jugendstil in Germany and Austria, Louis Comfort Tiffany in New York, and American Arts and Crafts in Chicago. Each gallery explores the historic social milieu associated with these movements, accompanied by selected contextual objects of the period. “The true beauty and value of art jewelry lies in the artist’s vision and mastery of technique, rather than in the sum value and size of precious metals and stones. Each of the works in the exhibition is truly a complete work of art in miniature,” says Mr. Driehaus. “I’m delighted to exhibit my jewelry collection for the first time for Driehaus Museum visitors to enjoy, and am honored to be joined by the distinguished collectors and museums who recognize and celebrate their artistic quality. Together, these works tell a complete story of many jewelers’ aspirations, techniques, and accomplishments.” Highlights include four revival-style works by Mrs. Newman of London, who paved the way for female jewelry makers of the British Arts and Crafts movement; a daring brooch depicting the female nude form by the consummate French jeweler René Lalique; a Jugendstil pin by the Wiener Werkstätte, to be worn by the hostesses of Vienna’s premier Cabaret Fledermaus; rare designs by Julia Munson, the first director of Louis Comfort Tiffany’s jewelry studio; and exceptional works from Chicago’s distinguished Kalo Shop, founded by Clara Barck Welles. The companion book "Maker & Muse: Women and Early Twentieth Century Art Jewelry (The Monacelli Press) features essays by prominent experts in the jewelry field with each revealing new research about the unique women who created or inspired art jewelry. The book’s authors include Elyse Zorn Karlin, exhibition curator; Yvonne Markowitz and Emily Stroehrer of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Janis Staggs, of the Neue Galerie, New York; Jeannine Falino, Independent Curator, New York; and Sharon Darling, Historian, Chicago. The publication is comprised of stunning, full-color images by primary photographer John A. Faier and features a preface by collector Richard H. Driehaus. REVIEW: Maker & Muse: Women and Early Twentieth Century Art Jewelry features more than 250 exemplary works of art jewelry between the Victorian Era and the First World War, including cloak clasps, hair ornaments, pins, brooches, rings, bracelets, pendants, necklaces, and several tiaras. This groundbreaking exhibition illuminates the international proliferation of art jewelry through the lens of woman as its maker and muse. For the first time during this period, women emerged as prominent jewelry makers in their own right, establishing independent studios amid changing social norms. In other regions, the female figure acted as a powerful muse, appearing in jewelry as audacious and novel motifs. Drawn from the Driehaus Collection’s extensive jewelry holdings and prominent national collections, many of these stunning pieces have never been seen by the public. The exhibition upholds the same ideals of beauty as did its makers, who in the early decades of the twentieth century were inspired by broader art movements of the day to create audacious pieces of jewelry with dramatic forms, intricate craftsmanship, saturated colors, and semiprecious stones. Maker & Muse explores five different areas of jewelry design and fabrication: the Arts and Crafts Movement in Britain, Art Nouveau in France, Jugendstil in Germany and Austria, Louis Comfort Tiffany in New York, and American Arts and Crafts in Chicago. Each section explores the important female figures and historic social milieu associated with these movements, and is accompanied by historic photographs and immersive decorative arts of the period, including furnishings, posters, and stained glass. REVIEW: Featuring more than 250 exemplary works of art jewelry designed between the Victorian Era and the First World War. Items include cloak clasps, hair ornaments, pins, brooches, rings, bracelets, pendants, necklaces and, of course, several tiaras, this exhibition illuminates the international proliferation of art jewelry through the lens of women as its maker and muse. For the first time during this period, women emerged as prominent jewelry makers in their own right, establishing independent studios and changing social norms. In other regions, the female figure acted as a powerful muse appearing in jewelry as bold and novel motifs. Broader art movements of the day inspired jewelry makers to create bold pieces of jewelry with dramatic forms, intricate craftsmanship, and vivid colors. Maker and Muse explores five (5) different areas of art jewelry design: the Arts and Crafts Movement in Britain, Art Nouveau in France, Jugendstil in Germany and Austria, Louis Comfort Tiffany in New York, and American Arts and Crafts in Chicago (including the Kalo Shop founded by Clara Barck Welles). Drawn from the Driehaus Collection’s jewelry holdings and national collections, many of these pieces have never been seen by the public. REVIEW: Maker & Muse: Women and Early Twentieth Century Art Jewelry is a collaborative effort undertaken to accompany the current exhibit of the same name at the Richard H. Driehaus Museum in Chicago. Its 256 pages celebrate the role of women as creator of and inspiration for important jewelry from the turn of the 19th century. It showcases the history of women as jewelry designers, as muses portrayed on the jeweler’s canvas, and as wearers of the art during the Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau movements. This beautifully illustrated book contains seven well-organized chapters full of insight on the period, covering the British, German, Austrian, and American Arts and Crafts movements from 1890 to 1910 and the French and American Art Nouveau movements from 1900 to 1915. Museum founder Richard H. Driehaus, who owns the majority of the pieces on display, wrote the preface. While collecting decorative arts 15 years ago, he was drawn to a piece of Arts and Crafts jewelry in London. His collection blossomed from there to include Art Nouveau jewelry. The first two chapters are by the book’s editor and the curator of the exhibit, Elyse Zorn Karlin. Her first chapter is an overview of the women and their jewelry in the early 20th century. Karlin follows with the British Arts and Crafts Movement, which advocated economic and social reform, which is essentially anti-industrial. As a result, there was a greater emphasis on the finished piece art rather than materials. The next four chapters are essays by the expert curators who had a hand in the other four exhibition rooms at the Driehaus. Each chapter is embellished with remarkable photos of pertinent jewelry and their makers and muse. “Metamorphosis: The Female Figure in Art Nouveau” is written by Yvonne J. Markowitz, curator emerita of the Museum of Fine Art in Boston, and Emily Banis Stoehrer, curator of jewelry at the same museum. They explain that Art Nouveau jewelry, designed by men (most notably Rene Lalique) and worn by women, is the French high-end answer to the Arts and Crafts movement. The jewels are about natural forms and structures, flowers, plants, and curved lines. Jeannine Falino, an independent curator for the Museum of Art and Design in New York, writes the next chapter on the American art of Louis Comfort Tiffany, whose design staff included Julia Munson and Meta Overbeck. These women held the jewelry to the highest standards of artistry and quality. Tiffany branded his products, and the executors became mostly anonymous. Janis Staggs, author and curator of Neue Galerie in New York, documents the Arts and Crafts movement in Germany and Austria, known as Jugendstil or “youth style,” which brought about a shift in women’s social status as workers, patrons, suffragettes, athletes, artists, and muses. Well-known designers Josef Hoffman and Karl Rothmuller, along with artist Gustav Klimt, are contributors to this period. Sharon S. Darling, author of Chicago Metalsmiths: An Illustrated History, writes about the Chicago Arts and Crafts movement, where a large number of women worked as professional and amateur jewelers. Of particular note is the hand-wrought Kalo silver workshop, which was founded by six women graduates of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1900. The photography, principally by John A. Faier, the editing, and the quality of the paper and printing are superb. This book will find its way into the libraries of scholars, collectors, and professionals interested in the Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau movements, which still influence jewelry artists more than a century later. [Gemological Institute of America Inc. (GIA)]. REVIEW: Highlights include four pieces by Mrs. Newman of London, who paved the way for female jewelry makers of the British arts and crafts movement; a brooch depicting a female nude by René Lalique; a pin by the Wiener Werkstätte to be worn by the hostesses at Vienna’s premier Cabaret Fledermaus; rare designs by Julia Munson, the first director of Louis Comfort Tiffany’s jewelry studio; and exceptional works from Chicago’s Kalo Shop, founded by Clara Barck Welles. [The Magazine Antiques]. REVIEW: A palatial Chicago home from the Gilded Age is the setting for a new exhibition called Maker & Muse at the Driehaus Museum, featuring hundreds of pieces of one-of-a-kind jewelry. Beyond the artfully made works in Art Nouveau and Arts and Crafts styles, the exhibition also looks at the growing role of women in early 20th century design and craftsmanship. [WTTW Chicago Tonight]. REVIEW: “Maker & Muse” celebrates the considerable contribution women made to jewelry production and design at the turn of the 20th century, which was ground-breaking then, and still highly relevant today. [Jewelry History Today]. REVIEW: Like other art forms, jewelry production has cycled through trends and eras, and Art Jewelry isn’t just your everyday diamond solitaires. Art Jewelry was created between the late Victorian Era and World War I, a time when women’s roles in society were changing drastically and industrialization was reinventing the world. The jewelry reflects this exciting, tempestuous climate; curator Elyse Zorn Karlin cites a 'rebellion against the strictures of the past and a look toward an exciting, less-encumbered future' as one of the driving forces behind the movement. It’s less restricting-diamond-choker and more delicate lines, imaginative shapes, and bright colors. You’ll want to try the bijoux on yourself. [Chicago Magazine]. REVIEW: They say that clothes make the man, but plenty of Golden Age movie stars and debutantes would surely add that jewelry makes the woman. See for yourself if all the buzz about diamonds being a girl’s best friend is true at the Driehaus Museum’s next major exhibition—Maker & Muse: Women & Early Twentieth Century Art Jewelry. The exhibition will showcase the stunning jewelry collection of Richard H. Driehaus, who’s been privately collecting Art Nouveau and Arts and Crafts jewelry since the ’90s, and this will be the first time the collection will be on display to the public. Along with Driehaus’ motherlode, the Chicago History Museum will be contributing gems, as will other museums and collectors all over America. Like other art forms, jewelry production has cycled through trends and eras, and Art Jewelry isn’t just your everyday diamond solitaires. Art Jewelry was created between the late Victorian Era and World War I, a time when women’s roles in society were changing drastically and industrialization was reinventing the world. The jewelry reflects this exciting, tempestuous climate; curator Elyse Zorn Karlin cites a “rebellion against the strictures of the past and a look toward an exciting, less-encumbered future” as one of the driving forces behind the movement. It’s less restricting-diamond-choker and more delicate lines, imaginative shapes, and bright colors. REVIEW: This exhibition features more than two hundred and fifty pieces of jewelry created in the early decades of the twentieth century. During this vibrant period, jewelry makers in the world’s centers of design created audacious new styles in response to the growing industrialization of the world and changing role of women in society. Their alternative designs boldly artistic, exquisitely detailed, hand-wrought, and inspired by nature became known as art jewelry. "Maker & Muse" explores five different areas of art jewelry design and fabrications: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Britain, Art Nouveau in France, Jugendstil in Germany and Austria, Louis Comfort Tiffany in New York, and the American Arts and Crafts in Chicago. Work created by both men and women are exhibited together to highlight commonalities while illustrating each maker’s distinctive style, And in regions or movements that saw few women present in the workshop, the female remained unquestionably present in the mind of the designer. Not only did art jewelers intend to highlight the fashionable clothing and natural beauty of a woman during this period, they also often represented her within the work itself. While inspired by the broader art movements of the day and their unique cultures and contexts, designers strove together to created adventurous pieces of jewelry with dramatic forms, intricate craftsmanship, saturated colors, and semi-precious stones. Drawn from collection of Richard H. Driehaus and prominent natural public and private collections, this exhibition upholds the same ideal of beauty as did its talented makers. While some of the names of the makers are well known such as Rene Lalique, Henri Vever, Louis Comfort Tiffany, Marcus & Co. there are many others that are to be known from this exhibit of fine and often important jewelry. I make the distinction of fine as this exhibition focuses on women entering the field of precious metals and gemstone jewelry but overlooks the contributions of Coco Chanel of Europe and the American born Miriam Haskell who were also innovative jewelry designers. Miriam Haskell jewelry was non precious metals, and although only marketed in the better stores was more affordable than the pieces exhibited in Maker & Muse that are riches only available for the crème de la crème of society, I highly recommend this show, but keep in mind, unless your great grandmother or great great grandmother’s generations were extremely wealthy, you won’t find any of these pieces amongst your family heirlooms. But if you are lucky to find a Haskell piece, which weren’t hallmarked until after 1950, that non precious jewel could have more value than the diamonds those ancestors wore! REVIEW: “Maker & Muse: Women and Early Twentieth Century Art Jewelry” not only explores the resistance against mass production brought on by the Industrial Revolution but the way women were an integral part of that handcrafted jewelry movement. The museum highlights more than 250 ravishing items that include extremely intricate rings, pendants, necklaces, brooches, tiaras, and even cigarette holders. The exhibit is spread out through the second-floor galleries and divided by region. Start out in Britain, the foundation of art jewelry, where husband and wife teams were making these beautiful pieces that were inspired by nature as well as the changing social norms. The green, white, and violet in Child & Child’s gold, amethyst, pearl, and diamond suffragist necklace is a perfect example of women’s influence. Head into a constant staple of the Driehaus Museum in the Louis Comfort Tiffany room where his beautiful art jewelry is featured and you’ll learn that two women were actually in charge as heads of his jewelry studio. While exploring the German and French rooms you wont see women as the artists but as the muses. One of the most beautiful examples is in René Lalique’s winged sylph brooch made out of freshwater pearl and enamel where Lalique shows one of his themes of combining a woman’s figure with a feature of an insect or other animal that can be interpreted as a fairy or might be interpreted as a form of eroticism, which was popular theme during the time. The Driehaus brings it back home with the Chicago room featuring items from the Kalo Shop that was run by Clara Barck Welles. Welles mentored many notable art jewelers and had many women, known as the “Kalo Girls,” work on designs. Her shop sat on Michigan Avenue until it closed in 1970 and produced countless beautiful pieces starting in 1914. REVIEW: If you love jewelry and especially sumptiuous jewels created mostly by women from the early decades of the 20th Century, you should not miss the current exhibition Maker & Muse, Women and Early Twentieth Century Art Jewelry on view at the Driehaus Museum in Chicago. The Driehaus Museum is a must see jewel in Chicago as the spectacularly restored Nickerson Mansion. Applause to Richard H. Driehaus for sharing and showcasing wondrous examples from his collection and leading the way in exhibiting important turn of the Century objets d’Art and jewelry with a unique vision. The exhibition features more than 250 pieces of jewelry created in the early 20th Century and covers five areas of design and fabrication, the Arts & Crafts Movement in Great Britain, Art Nouveau in France, Jugendstil in Germany and Austria, Louis Comfort Tiffany in New York, and American Arts & Crafts in Chicago. REVIEW: Assembling more than 250 cloak clasps, hair ornaments, pins, brooches, rings, bracelets, pendants and necklaces, "Maker & Muse: Women and Early Twentieth Century Art Jewelry" explores jewelry created between the Victorian Era and World War I. The exhibition highlights the influential women who wore these pieces as well as the female jewelry makers who rose to prominence during the period. [Time Out Chicago]. READER REVIEWS: REVIEW: This exceptional volume highlights early 20th Century hand-made art jewelry that was predominantly fashioned by women designers and metalsmiths in Europe and the United States. Essays and exquisite photographs illustrate some of the finest and most innovative works from England, France, and Germany, as well as Tiffany & Co. in New York, the Kalo Shop and several other leading studios in Chicago. The styles are referred to as Arts & Crafts, Art Nouveau, and Jugendstil, but all are extraordinary examples of Art Jewelry that is hard to replicate today because of the hand workmanship that began with the basic raw materials. This unique survey of jewelry motifs and styles also underscores the socio-political and economic changes in the status of women and their universal quest for self-sufficiency, self-worth and political freedom through Democratic reforms and artistic expression. Designed for a stunning Chicago exhibition at the Richard H. Driehaus Museum that runs through 2015, this stand-alone volume is indispensable to any collector, curator or historian. REVIEW: This large book features exquisite color photos that clearly show the details of the jewelry (most on a full-page). I love Art Nouveau jewelry and many pieces are shown in Maker & Muse, but also learned about the artistic design movements in Britain, America, Austria and Germany of this time. Women were often depicted in the jewelry (muse) and often had a hand in making the jewelry as well. Their stories are detailed here -- some becoming famous for their own lines of jewelry. Since a good number of the pieces are in private collections or museums, it is wonderful to have a chance to see them here. REVIEW: A feast for the eyes! Beautiful book with scrumptious photographs and well written histories. I highly recommend this book. REVIEW: Very good narrative accompanies the outstanding photographs. I was inspired to see the actual exhibition at the Driehaus Museum in Chicago. I learned so much about this time period and many women jewelers of the era. REVIEW: Like all my books l choose carefully. So happy that this book has joined my library's jewelry collection REVIEW: I bought this book for a jewelry-making friend of mine and she was more than thrilled for the birthday gift. This book's color plates are stunning and of high quality. I think I'll buy another to keep! Thank you! REVIEW: Beautiful photos and beautiful printing! Great writing of this historical time of Women in Jewelry Craft! REVIEW: Fabulous. It should be in your library if you love jewelry and especially if you love the Arts & Crafts era. REVIEW: Really fabulous photography and narration. A must have! REVIEW: Five stars! Beautiful book! REVIEW: Excellent book! Fabulous images! I always ship books Media Mail in a padded mailer. This book is shipped FOR FREE via USPS INSURED media mail (“book rate”). All domestic shipments and most international shipments will include free USPS Delivery Confirmation (you might be able to update the status of your shipment on-line at the USPS Web Site) and free insurance coverage. A small percentage of international shipments may require an additional fee for tracking and/or delivery confirmation. If you are concerned about a little wear and tear to the book in transit, I would suggest a boxed shipment - it is an extra $1.00. Whether via padded mailer or box, we will give discounts for multiple purchases. International orders are welcome, but shipping costs are substantially higher. Most international orders cost an additional $12.99 to $33.99 for an insuredshipment in a heavily padded mailer, and typically includes some form of rudimentary tracking and/or delivery confirmation (though for some countries, this is only available at additional cost). There is also a discount program which can cut postage costs by 50% to 75% if you’re buying about half-a-dozen books or more (5 kilos+). Rates and available services vary a bit from country to country. You can email or message me for a shipping cost quote, but I assure you they are as reasonable as USPS rates allow, and if it turns out the rate is too high for your pocketbook, we will cancel the sale at your request. ADDITIONAL PURCHASES do receive a VERY LARGE discount, typically about $5 per book (for each additional book after the first) so as to reward you for the economies of combined shipping/insurance costs. Your purchase will ordinarily be shipped within 48 hours of payment. We package as well as anyone in the business, with lots of protective padding and containers. All of our shipments are sent via insured mail so as to comply with PayPal requirements. We do NOT recommend uninsured shipments, and expressly disclaim any responsibility for the loss of an uninsured shipment. Unfortunately the contents of parcels are easily “lost” or misdelivered by postal employees – even in the USA. That’s why all of our domestic shipments (and most international) shipments include a USPS delivery confirmation tag; or are trackable or traceable, and all shipments (international and domestic) are insured. We do offer U.S. Service Priority Mail, Registered Mail, and Express Mail for both international and domestic shipments, as well United Parcel Service (UPS) and Federal Express (Fed-Ex). Please ask for a rate quotation. We will accept whatever payment method you are most comfortable with. If upon receipt of the item you are disappointed for any reason whatever, I offer a no questions asked return policy. Send it back, I will give you a complete refund of the purchase price (less our original shipping costs). Most of the items I offer come from the collection of a family friend who was active in the field of Archaeology for over forty years. However many of the items also come from purchases I make in Eastern Europe, India, and from the Levant (Eastern Mediterranean/Near East) from various institutions and dealers. Though I have always had an interest in archaeology, my own academic background was in sociology and cultural anthropology. After my retirement however, I found myself drawn to archaeology as well. Aside from my own personal collection, I have made extensive and frequent additions of my own via purchases on Ebay (of course), as well as many purchases from both dealers and institutions throughout the world - but especially in the Near East and in Eastern Europe. I spend over half of my year out of the United States, and have spent much of my life either in India or Eastern Europe. In fact much of what we generate on Yahoo, Amazon and Ebay goes to support The Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, as well as some other worthy institutions in Europe connected with Anthropology and Archaeology. I acquire some small but interesting collections overseas from time-to-time, and have as well some duplicate items within my own collection which I occasionally decide to part with. Though I have a collection of ancient coins numbering in the tens of thousands, my primary interest is in ancient jewelry. My wife also is an active participant in the "business" of antique and ancient jewelry, and is from Russia. I would be happy to provide you with a certificate/guarantee of authenticity for any item you purchase from me. There is a $2 fee for mailing under separate cover. Whenever I am overseas I have made arrangements for purchases to be shipped out via domestic mail. If I am in the field, you may have to wait for a week or two for a COA to arrive via international air mail. But you can be sure your purchase will arrive properly packaged and promptly - even if I am absent. And when I am in a remote field location with merely a notebook computer, at times I am not able to access my email for a day or two, so be patient, I will always respond to every email. Please see our "ADDITIONAL TERMS OF SALE." TRANSLATE Arabic Chinese French German Greek Indonesian Italian Hindi Japanese Korean Swedish Portuguese Russian Spanish Hardcover Yes Material Paper Pages 256 pages Condition: Pre-Owned, Hardcover: Yes, Material: Paper, Pages: 256 pages, UPC: Does not apply, Brand: Unbranded

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