Buffy The Vampire Slayer Complete DVD Collection Box Set 20th Anniversary SEALED

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Seller: Top-Rated Seller tkirke (64.646) 99.4%, Location: London, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 202559663971 Buffy The Vampire Slayer The Complete Collection 39 DVD SET All 144 episodes on 39 DVDs BRAND NEW & SEALED Genuine UK Region 2 DVDs Buffy is sixteen years old and is the "chosen one" . She gets to kill vampires because it is her destiny to do so. She had a bad reputation at her old school in Los Angeles because she had burned the gym down. The principal at her new school at first rips up her records, and then tapes her records back together again. Buffy tries to explain that the gym at her old school had to be burned down because it was full of vampires! Buffy and her mom just want a fresh start in their new, suburban California home, where the good part of town is half a block away from the bad part of town. In her new high school, Buffy meets an eccentric librarian who knows that Buffy is the "chosen one". At first, the librarian scares her away by showing her a book about vampires, but then she returns to the library, knowing that the librarian can help her out with fighting off vampires and other supernatural things. From its charming and angst-ridden first season to the darker, apocalyptic final one, Buffy the Vampire Slayer succeeds on many levels, and in a fresher and more authentic way than the shows that came before or after it. How lucky, then, that with the release of its boxed set of seasons 1-7, you can have the estimable pleasure of watching a near-decade of Buffy in any order you choose. (And we have some ideas about how that should be done.) First: rest assured that there's no shame in coming to Buffy late, even if you initially turned your nose up at the winsome Sarah Michelle Gellar kicking the **** out of vampires (in Buffy-lingo, vamps), demons, and other evil-doers. Perhaps you did so because, well, it looked sort of science-fiction-like with all that monster latex. Start with season 3 and see that Buffy offers something for everyone, and the sooner you succumb to it, the quicker you'll appreciate how textured and riveting a drama it is. Why season 3? Because it offers you a winning cast of characters who have fallen from innocence: their hearts have been broken, their egos trampled in typically vicious high-school style, and as a result, they've begun to realize how fallible they are. As much as they try, there are always more monsters, or a bigger evil. Despite this, or perhaps because of it, the core crew remains something of a unit--there's the smart girl, Willow (Alyson Hannigan) who dreams of saving the day by downloading the plans to City Hall's sewer tunnels and mapping a route to safety. There are the ne'r do wells--the vampire Spike (James Marsters), who both clashes with and aspires to love Buffy; the tortured and torturing Angel (David Boreanz); the pretty, popular girl with an empty heart (Charisma Carpenter); and the teenage everyman, Xander (Nicholas Brendon). Then there's Buffy herself, who in the course of seven seasons morphs from a sarcastic teenager in a minidress to a heroine whose tragic flaw is an abiding desire to be a "normal" girl. On a lesser note, with the boxed set you can watch the fashion transformation of Buffy from mall rat to Prada-wearing, kickboxing diva with enviable highlights. (There was the unfortunate bob of season 2, but it's a forgivable lapse.) At least the storyline merits the transformations: every time Buffy has to end a relationship she cuts her hair, shedding both the pain and her vulnerability. In addition to the well-wrought teenage emotional landscape, Buffy deftly takes on more universal themes--power, politics, death, morality--as the series matures in seasons 4-6. And apart from a few missteps that haven't aged particularly well ("I Robot" in season 1 comes to mind), most episodes feel as harrowing and as richly drawn as they did at first viewing. That's about as much as you can ask for any form of entertainment: that it offer an escape from the viewer's workaday world and entry into one in which the heroine (ideally one with leather pants) overcomes demons far more troubling than one's own. Season 1 Buffy Summers (Sarah Michelle Gellar) looks like your typical perky high-schooler, and like most, she has her secret fears and anxieties. However, while most teens are worrying about their next date, their next zit, or their next term paper, Buffy's angsting over the next vampire she has to slay. See, Buffy, a young woman with superhuman strength, is the "chosen one," and she must help rid the world of evil, namely by staking demons. The exceptional first season of Buffy the Vampire Slayer introduces us to the treacherous world of Sunnydale High School (where Buffy moved after torching her previous high school's gym). The characters there include "watcher" Giles (Anthony Stewart Head) and the original "Scooby Gang" members--friendly geek Xander (Nicholas Brendon), computer whiz Willow (Alyson Hannigan), and snobbish popular girl Cordelia (Charisma Carpenter)--who aid Buffy in her quest. Those used to the darker tone that Buffy took in its later seasons will be surprised by the lighter feeling these first 12 episodes have--it's kind of like Buffy 90210 as the cast grapples with regular teen problems in addition to saving the world from demonic darkness. Fans of the show will enjoy the crisp writing, the phenomenal chemistry of the cast (already well-established within the first few episodes), and the introduction to characters that would stay for many seasons, including moody vampire Angel (David Boreanaz). Through it all, Gellar carries the series with amazing confidence, whether conveying the despair of high school or dispatching various demons--she's one of TV's most distinctive and strongest heroines. DVD Features: Available Subtitles: English Available Audio Tracks: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround) Commentary by: Joss Whedon on episodes 1 and 2 12 episodes on 3 discs: Welcome to the Hellmouth, The Harvest, Witch, Teacher's Pet, Never Kill a Boy on the First Date, The Pack, Angel, I Robot...You Jane, The Puppet Show, Nightmares, Out of Mind Out of Sight, Prophecy Girl Exclusive interview with Joss Whedon and David Boreanaz Interviews with Joss Whedon on "Welcome to the Hellmouth," "The Harvest," "Witch," "Never Kill a Boy on the First Date," "Angel," and "The Puppet Show" Original pilot episode script Photo gallery Season 2 At the heart of the first years of Joss Whedon's Buffy the Vampire Slayer was the romance between Buffy (Sarah Michelle Gellar), slayer of all things evil, and hunky Angel (David Boreanaz), the tortured vampire destined to walk the earth with a soul. The second season of Buffy took the Buffy-Angel pas de deux from ecstasy to agony in a now-classic plot arc that catapulted the show from WB teen drama to true TV greatness. You see, if the cursed Angel ever experiences true happiness for a moment, he'll revert to being an evil vampire again. And guess what happens after Buffy and Angel finally declare their love for one another and consummate their relationship... Buffy found its true momentum during the second season, as geeky Xander (Nicholas Brendon) fell in love with popular girl Cordelia (Charisma Carpenter), Willow (Alyson Hannigan) gave up her crush on Xander in favor of werewolf boy Oz (Seth Green), and watcher Giles (Anthony Stewart Head) began a sweetly tentative relationship with computer teacher (and witch) Jenny Calendar (Robia LaMorte). Mayhem came to Sunnydale, though, in the form of evil vampires Drusilla (Juliet Landau) and Spike (drolly wicked James Marsters), who were more than ready to aid and abet Angel as he turned bad. It all sounds like horror-action mayhem (and there are great fight scenes), but Buffy took on its plotlines with amazing depth, intelligence, and humor. And oh, man, the love story! Buffy and Angel's tragic relationship is one of the most heartbreaking you'll ever find. Buffy's final dilemma finds her having to save the world at Angel's expense, and Gellar (who deserves a passel of Emmys for her work) is phenomenal at telegraphing Buffy's swirling conflicts between love and duty. This is some of the best TV ever made, period. DVD Features: Available Audio Tracks: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround) 22 episodes on six discs Disc 2: Audio commentary for "Reptile Boy" by writer and director David Greenwalt, script for "Reptile Boy" Disc 3: Audio commentary for "What's My Line?" (part 1) by co-writer Marti Noxon, Audio commentary for "What's My Line?" (part 2) by co-writer Marti Noxon, script for "What's My Line?" (part 1), script for "What's My Line?" (part 2) Disc 4: Interview with Joss Whedon on "Surprise" (1:20), Interview with Joss Whedon on "Innocence" (1:50), audio commentary for "Innocence" by writer and director Joss Whedon, script for "Innocence" Disc 5: Interview with Joss Whedon on "Passion" (2:10), interview with Joss Whedon on "I Only Have Eyes For You" (1:30) Disc 6: Interview with Joss Whedon on "Becoming", interview with Joss Whedon on, featurette: "Designing Buffy" (13:42), featurette: "A Buffy Bestiary" (29:21), featurette: "Beauty and Beasts" (20:13), 2 UK TV spots, 6 domestic TV spots: "Spectacular", "Sensation", "The Warrior", "Ultimate Scare", "Deadly Trap", "Big Bad John", "Angel" video trailer (1:00), season 2 "Buffy" DVD trailer (1:00), still gallery of set designs and monsters, updated cast bios, additional still photo galleries (150 stills) Season 3 The third season of Joss Whedon's Buffy the Vampire Slayer was marked by the arrival in Sunnydale of renegade slayer Faith (Eliza Dushku), a moody loner who seemed to like her demon-staking calling just a little too much. While Buffy (Sarah Michelle Gellar) was always wary of Faith, the two developed a deep friendship and appreciative rapport--that is, until the evil mayor of Sunnydale (Harry Groener) tapped into Faith's dark side and lured her into his plot to take over the world, first as a double agent spying on Buffy, then as out-and-out nemesis. And as the mayor's ascension approached--which happened to fall on Sunnydale High's graduation day--Buffy and Faith's battles got nastier and nastier, as Buffy attempted to wrestle with her dark side (literally and figuratively), save the world and her friends, and keep her lover Angel (David Boreanaz) out of Faith's evil clutches. Chock-full of exceptional episodes, this third season started out with a bang (the superb season opener "Anne," in which a runaway Buffy finally returns to her Slayer calling) and never let up. Among other highlights, the season introduced former vengeance demon and soon-to-be regular Anya (Emma Caulfield), fleshed out Angel's tortured character (and readied him for his own series), and featured a hilarious doppelganger Willow (Alyson Hannigan), a vampire from a parallel universe, who in Willow's own words was "evil and... skanky... and kinda gay!" (Total foreshadowing there, folks.) The season's pièce de résistance, though, was the two-parter "Graduation Day," wherein Faith tries to kill Angel, and the students of Sunnydale High prepare to do battle with a mutated mayor and his army of demons. Aside from the series' exceptional writing and acting, this compelling year of Buffy was anchored by the consistently excellent Gellar, as well as Dushku's complicated Faith, a girl you truly love to hate. By the time you finish these episodes, Faith will have cast a spell on you that you'll find very hard to shake. DVD Features: Available Subtitles: English Available Audio Tracks: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround) Commentary by: writer David Fury on 'Helpless' Commentary by: writer Doug Petrie on 'Bad Girls' Commentary by: director Michael Gershman on 'Consequences' Commentary by: writer Jane Espenson on 'Earshot' 22 episodes on six discs: Anne, Dead Man's Party, Faith Hope & Trick, Beauty and the Beasts, Homecoming, Band Candy, Revelations, Lover's Walk, The Wish, Amends, Gingerbread, Helpless, The Zeppo, Bad Girls, Consequences, Doppelgangland, Enemies, Earshot, Choices, The Prom, Graduation Day Part One, Graduation Day Part Two Five featurettes: Buffy Speak, Season 3 Overview, Wardrobe, Weapons, Special Effects Special interviews with Joss Whedon Interview with monster maker John Vulich Scripts for 'Faith, Hope & Trick,' 'Band Candy,' 'Lover's Walk,' and 'The Wish' Still gallery Season 4 Having battled a hellish vampire master, an evil boyfriend, a rogue slayer, a giant man-eating demon-snake thing, and a particularly nasty high school principal, Buffy Summers embarked on one of her biggest challenges in the fourth season of Buffy the Vampire Slayer: college. With boyfriend Angel out of the picture (and on his own show) and Sunnydale High destroyed, new horizons were to be tackled for Buffy and the rest of the Scooby gang. There were cute guys (Buffy's new boyfriend Riley), cute girls (Willow's new girlfriend Tara--yes, Willow's gay!), frat parties, irritating roommates, harsh professors, and, oh yes, a secret military initiative that was experimenting on the demon population (Riley's part of it). Buffy truly hit its golden years in the fourth season--just when you thought this show couldn't get any better, Joss Whedon and his creative team pulled out all the stops and took Buffy and co. into rich new territory. By far, the highlight of the season (and the entire series) was the Emmy-nominated "Hush," a nearly dialogue-free episode in which the creepy "Gentlemen" rob Sunnydale of its collective voice, and Buffy and Riley finally come face to face with each other's hidden identities. While Frankenstein-esque monster Adam wasn't the show's best villain (you'll have to wait until next season's Glory for that), he was a worthy adversary for the biotech age, and the military milieu was a nice contrast to Buffy's previous gothic outings. Season 4 also marked the return of blond vampire Spike (who developed a crush on Buffy), the ascension of vengeance demon Anya to full-time cast status, and the brief return of bad slayer Faith (in a fab two-part body-switching episode). Throughout, the entire cast, headed by the unparalleled Sarah Michelle Gellar, worked television magic of the kind rarely seen on the small screen. This is Buffy at its best. DVD Features: Available Subtitles: English Available Audio Tracks: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround Commentary by: Joss Whedon on 'Hush' and 'Restless' Commentary by: Joss Whedon, Marti Noxon, and Seth Greenon on 'Wild at Heart' Commentary by: writer Doug Petrie on 'The Initiative' and 'This Year's Girl' Commentary by: Jane Espenson on 'Superstar' 22 episodes on six discs: The Freshman, Living Conditions, The Harsh Light of Day, Fear Itself, Beer Bad, Wild at Heart, The Initiative, Pangs, Something Blue, Hush, Doomed, A New Man, The I in Team, Goodbye Iowa, This Year's Girl, Who Are You?, Superstar, Where the Wild Things Are, New Moon Rising, The Yoko Factor, Primeval, Restless Season 4 Overview Featurettes: Hush, Spike Me, Oz Revelations: A Full Moon, Buffy Inside the Music, The Sets of Sunnydale Original scripts for 'Fear Itself,' 'Hush,' 'Who Are You?,' and 'Restless' Cast bios Still gallery Season 5 The fifth season of Joss Whedon's hit series started out in excellent form as slayer extraordinaire Buffy Summers (Sarah Michelle Gellar) did battle with the most famous of vampires (that Dracula guy) and then went on to spar with another nemesis, little sister Dawn (Michelle Trachtenberg). Wait--Buffy has a teenage sister? Where has she been the past four years? And why is everyone acting like she's always been around? Turns out that young Dawn is actually "The Key," a form of pure energy that, true to its name, helps open the gates between different dimensions. To protect said key from falling into the wrong hands, a group of monks gave it human form and sent it to the fiercely protective Buffy for safekeeping, creating new memories of Dawn for everyone as if she'd existed... well, always. Why all the super secrecy? There's this very, very, very bad girl named Glory (Clare Kramer) who wants the key very badly, and will do anything to get it. Oh, and by the way, Glory isn't just a run-of-the-mill demon... she's way worse. Some fans will tell you that Buffy "jumped the shark" with the introduction of Dawn, when in actuality this season was the pinnacle of the show's achievement, as there was superb comedy to be had ("Buffy Vs. Dracula," the double-Xander episode "The Replacement," the introduction of the "Buffybot" in "Intervention") as well as some of television's best drama. The Whedon-scripted and -directed "The Body" remains one of Buffy's best episodes, when the young woman who faces down supernatural death on a daily basis finds herself powerless in the wake of her mother's sudden passing. The first third or so of the season was a bit choppy, but once the evil Glory came into her own, Buffy was a television force to be reckoned with. Kramer was the show's best villain (after the evil Angel, natch), and the supporting cast was never better. But as always, it was the superb Gellar who was the powerful center of the show, sparking opposite lovelorn vampire Spike (James Marsters) and wrestling with moral dilemmas rarely seen on television. With this season, Buffy Summers became, like Tony Soprano, one of television's true greats. DVD Features: Available Subtitles: English Available Audio Tracks: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround Commentary by: writer David Fury and director David Grossman on 'Real Me' Commentary by: writer Doug Petrie on 'Fool for Love' Commentary by: writer Jane Espenson on 'I Was Made to Love You' Commentary by: writer/director Joss Whedon on 'The Body' 22 episodes on six discs Scripts for 'The Replacement,' 'Fool for Love,' 'Into the Woods,' and 'Checkpoint' "Buffy Abroad" featurette "Demonology: A Slayer's Guide" featurette "Casting Buffy" featurette "Action Heroes! The Stunts of Buffy" featurette Series outtakes "The Story of Season 5" featurette "Natural Causes" featurette "Spotlight on Dawn" featurette Still gallery Interactive video game trailer DVD-ROM: Buffy Demon Guide Season 6 The sixth season of Buffy the Vampire Slayer followed the logic of plot and character development into some gloomy places. The year begins with Buffy being raised from the dead by the friends who miss her, but who fail to understand that a sacrifice taken back is a sacrifice negated. Dragged out of what she believes to have been heavenly bliss, she finds herself "going through the motions" and entering into a relationship with the evil, besotted vampire Spike just to force her emotions. Willow becomes ever more caught up in the temptations of magic; Xander and Anya move towards marriage without ever discussing their reservations; Giles feels he is standing in the way of Buffy's adult independence; Dawn feels neglected. What none of them need is a menace that is, at this point, simply annoying--three high school contemporaries who have turned their hand to magical and high-tech villainy. Added to this is a hungry ghost, an invisibility ray, an amnesia spell and a song-and-dance demon (who acts as rationale for the incomparable musical episode "Once More, with Feeling"). This is a year in which chickens come home to roost: everything from the villainy of the three geeks to Xander's doubts about marriage come to a head, often--as in the case of the impressive wedding episode--through wildly dark humor. The estrangement of the characters from each other--a well-observed portrait of what happens to college pals in their early 20s--comes to a shocking head with the death of a major character and that death's apocalyptic consequences. The series ends on a consoling note which it has, by that point and in spite of imperfections, entirely earned. DVD Features: Available Subtitles: English Available Audio Tracks: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround) Commentary by: Marti Nixon and David Fury on 'Bargaining' Commentary by: writer/director Joss Whedon on 'Once More, with Feeling' Commentary by: Drew Z. Greenberg on 'Smashed' Commentary by: David Soloman and Rebecca Rand Kirshner on 'Hell's Bells' Commentary by: Rick Rosenthal and Diego Gutierrez on 'Normal Again' Commentary by James Contner and David Fury on 'Grave' 21 episodes on 6 discs: Bargaining, After Life, Flooded, Serial Life, All the Way, Once More with Feeling, Tabula Rasa, Smashed, Wrecked, Gone, Doublemeat Palace, Dead Things, Older and Far Away, As You Were, Hell's Bells, Normal Again, Entropy, Seeing Red, Villains, Two to Go, Grave Behind-the-scenes featurettes Exclusive David Fury behind-the-scenes featurette: "Once More, with Feeling" "Buffy the Vampire Slayer: TV with Bite" as seen on A&E's TV-ography Easter eggs Music videos: "I've got a Theory/Bunnies/We're Together," "I'll Never Tell," "Walk Through the Fire" Academy of Television Arts and Sciences panel discussion Outtakes Interactive game trailer DVD-ROM Season 7 The seventh and final season of Buffy the Vampire Slayer begins with a mystery: someone is murdering teenage girls all over the world and something is trying hard to drive Spike mad. Buffy is considerably more cheerful in these episodes than we have seen her during the previous year as she trains Dawn and gets a job as student counselor at the newly rebuilt Sunnydale High. Willow is recovering from the magical addiction which almost led her to destroy the world, but all is not yet well with her, or with Anya, who has returned to being a Vengeance demon in "Same Time, Same Place" and "Selfless," and both women are haunted by their decisions. Haunting of a different kind comes in the excellent "Conversations with Dead People" (one of the show's most terrifying episodes ever), in which a mysterious song is making Spike kill again in spite of his soul and his chip. Giles turns up in "Bring on the Night" and Buffy has to fight one of the deadliest vampires of her career in "Showtime". In "Potential" Dawn faces a fundamental reassessment of her purpose in life. Buffy was always a show about female empowerment, but it was also a show about how ordinary people can decide to make a difference alongside people who are special. And it was also a show about people making up for past errors and crimes. So, for example, we have the excellent episodes "Storyteller", in which the former geek/supervillain Andrew sorts out his redemption while making a video diary about life with Buffy; and "Lies My Parents Told Me," in which we find out why a particular folk song sends Spike crazy. Redemption abounds as Faith returns to Sunnydale and the friends she once betrayed, and Willow finds herself turning into the man she flayed. Above all, this was always Buffy's show: Sarah Michelle Gellar does extraordinary work here both as Buffy and as her ultimate shadow, the First Evil, who takes her face to mock her. This is a fine ending to one of television's most remarkable shows. DVD Features: Available Subtitles: English, Available Audio Tracks: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround) 22 episodes on six discs: Lessons, Beneath You, Same Time Same Place, Help, Selfless, Him, Conversations with Dead People, Sleeper, Never Leave Me, Bring On the Night, Showtime, Potential, The Killer in Me, First Date, Get It Done, Storyteller, Lies My Parents Told Me, Dirty Girls, Empty Places, Touched, End of Days, Chosen Commentary by Joss Whedon and director/co-executive producer David Solomon on "Lessons" Commentary by director/co-executive producer David Solomon and writer Drew Goddard on "Selfless" Commentary by director Nick Marck, writer/co-executive producer Jane Espenson, writer Drew Goddard, Danny Strong, and Tom Lenk on "Conversations with Dead People" Commentary by David Solomon and writer Drew Z. Greenberg on "The Killer in Me" Commentary by director David Fury, writer Drew Goddard, James Marsters ("Spike"), and D.B. Woodside ("Principal Wood") on "Lies My Parents Told Me" Commentary by Drew Goddard and Nicholas Brendon ("Xander") on "Dirty Girls" Commentary by Joss Whedon on "Chosen" Featurettes: Buffy: It's Always Been About the Fans, Buffy 101: Studying the Slayer, Generation S, The Last Sundown Season 7 overview: "Buffy: Full Circle" Outtakes reel Buffy Wraps DVD-ROM: Willow Demon GuideLanguage: English Subtitles: English THESE ARE REGION 2 DISCS. THEY WILL PLAY ON ALL UK AND EUROPEAN DVD PLAYERS If you are outside Europe, please ensure that your DVD player is capable of playing Region 2 DVDs *** THIS BOX SET IS BRAND NEW & SEALED *** Pay me securely by credit or debit card Other Payment Options ChequeBank Transfer Postal Order International Money Order Condition: New, Modified Item: No, Season: Complete Series Box Set, Region Code: DVD: 2 (Europe, Japan, Middle East...), Edition: Box Set, Non-Domestic Product: No, Sub-Genre: Vampires, Leading Role: Seth Green, Release Year: 2011, Rating: 15, Format: DVD

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