1919 Charles Morgan THE GUNROOM, Novel Based on his ROYAL NAVY Service 1907-1913

EUR 43,75 Buy It Now 21d 22h, EUR 9,46 Shipping, 14-Day Returns, Pay with PayPal and you're fully protected.

Seller: Top-Rated Seller dilapsus (6.918) 100%, Location: Flamborough, Bridlington, Ships to: Americas, Europe, Asia, AU, Item: 123246826406 The Gunroom by Charles Langbridge Morgan This is the 1919 First Edition This is a First edition of Morgan's first novel, based on his experiences in the Royal Navy between 1907 and 1913. The Gunroom criticised the Royal Navy, in particular the continual mistreatment of junior Officers. As a result it was unofficially suppressed and thus fairly scarce. Front cover and spine Further images of this book are shown below Publisher and place of publication Dimensions in inches (to the nearest quarter-inch) London: A. & C. Black, Ltd, 4, 5 & 6 Soho Square, W. 1 5 inches wide x 8 inches tall Edition Length 1919 First Edition [with the 'n' missing from the word 'and' on page 78; and the word 'least' poorly printed on page 92] [viii] + 348 pages Condition of covers Internal condition Original blue cloth gilt. The covers are worn. The front and rear covers have faded, generally fairly evenly, apart from a section near the top, which is much more heavily faded. The spine has faded significantly, with total loss of original colour. There is a prominent vertical crease down the spine and the ends are chipped and frayed, with a half-inch split at the head and a quarter-inch split at the tail. The corners are bumped and there are some indentations along the edges of the boards. The inner hinges are badly cracked: the front hinge has the mull exposed as the pastedown end-paper has peeled back; the rear hinge is cracked at page 345, leaving the last few pages loose (please see the finally two images below). There is some separation between the inner gatherings. The end-papers are discoloured and foxed. The paper has tanned with age, there is some scattered foxing and some corners have been creased down. The edge of the text block is dust-stained and lightly foxed. Dust-jacket present? Other comments No This is a worn example overall of Morgan's first book, reflecting his harsh treatment in the pre-First World War Royal Navy, with a badly faded and somewhat damaged spine, and badly cracked hinges. Illustrations, maps, etc Contents NONE : No illustrations are called for Please see below for details Post & shipping information Payment options The packed weight is approximately 800 grams. Full shipping/postage information is provided in a panel at the end of this listing. Payment options : UK buyers: cheque (in GBP), debit card, credit card (Visa, MasterCard but not Amex), PayPal International buyers: credit card (Visa, MasterCard but not Amex), PayPal Full payment information is provided in a panel at the end of this listing. The Gunroom Contents I. The Shore Recedes II. Seen Through Steel III. A Chapter Without Name IV. War, Carpets, and Candles V. Two Worlds VI. Strain and Relief VII. Margaret VIII. The Net IX. Quartered on the Kingdom X. Eastern Seas XI. Away from the Ship XII. The Captain in Confidence XIII. Looking Beyond XIV. Waste and Wonder XV. Trafalgar and the Red Lamp XVI. The Engines XVII. Decision XVIII. In the Cross-Passage XIX. Crisis XX. Wingfield Alter XXI. The Currency XXII. Margaret in the Net XXIII. An Instant Free XXIV. One Year Later: The World in the Net The Gunroom Excerpt (War, Carpets, and Candles) I The fleet put in to Arosa Bay, and, in less than twelve hours, sailed thence without regret. On the day following their departure an event occurred which, for the time being, changed the lives of every member of the King Arthur's company. Late in the forenoon watch a wireless signal was received and immediately submitted to the Rear-Admiral. This much of its contents became public: that the Admiralty had ordered the Cruiser Squadron, which at the time was making common speed with the battleships, to proceed independently to Gibraltar at sixteen knots. This speed, unusual and uneconomical enough to suggest that there was serious reason for it, combined with the tension already created in men's minds by the happenings at Agadir, gave wonderful import to the news, which spread with almost magical rapidity from the bridge to the officers' messes, from the fo'c's'le to the boiler-room depths. Speculation as to the meaning of the order was anxious and eager. Rumours of war had in times past been so frequent as to colour all prophecies with scepticism, but hope remained— hope that now at length the consummation was at hand. The Rear-Admiral unbent so far as to jest with the officer of the watch. The Yeoman of Signals overheard him, and repeated his words on the lower bridge. The lower bridge handed on the tale to the boatswain's mate, who, having embellished it, shared its marvel with the lower deck. In a quarter of an hour the Rear-Admiral's rood-humour had permeated the ship. A Pay-master celebrated it in the Wardroom Casemate by paying for a round of drinks. The Senior Engineer put on clean overalls and went smiling below. The stokers grumbled no more, but fired their boilers and slammed their furnace-doors with vigorous enthusiasm. They were not going to Gibraltar now to carry out gun-practice in Catalan Bay, gun-practice in Tetuan, gun-practice in Catalan again. "Sixteen knots!" remarked a Chief Stoker, with emphasis that made explanation unnecessary. " Sixteen knots !" said one of the carpenter's crew. "Looks as if we shan't need them targets wi' the little red sails." Even in the Gunroom, comradeship displaced boredom. The Chaplain relaxed discipline during School. Baring came in to drink a glass of sherry and to share Wardroom opinion with Winton-Black. Midshipmen, senior, intermediate, and junior, looked towards the future from a common standpoint. The Clerk saw his ledger shrouded in the mists of the past. His action-station, he said a dozen times, was with the Dumaresq. "You won't see much of the show from the Dumaresq," said Banford-Smith, and the Clerk replied humbly, but with complete happiness: No, but it's better than the Ship's Office." There was, too, a wonderful moment in which Krame seemed to forget that John was a Wart whose duty it was to tidy up the Gunroom, to polish the stove-pipes, and to do scuttle-drill when the sea ran high and ventilation became necessary. " Come on deck, Lynwood," he said. "We had better have a glance round our guns for minor defects." They strolled on deck together and visited every casemate in their group. In that time they were friends, officers charged with a common responsibility. The great game was about to begin, the game for which the whole Service had been training for many weary years. All routine, all hardness, all drudgery had become suddenly worth while. Spirit had entered into the flesh. At no time while he served in the King Arthur was John happier. He and Fane-Herbert, knowing nothing of war, congratulated themselves upon the fact that it had come to them so early in their careers. " And isn't it amazing what a difference it makes ?" said Fane-Herbert. " The Gunroom is changed. All the senior snotties act as though we were their friends." " I expect they would be better in the ordinary course," John answered, " if they got more leave clear away from the ship, and weren't so infernally bored by unbroken routine." But the excitement and its excellent effect endured not long. When they arrived at Gibraltar nothing happened. The next day, while they coaled ship, hope waned. " Come on, lads," cried a petty officer to encourage the grimy workers, " that's about where Agadir lies." He pointed a finger towards Africa. But they laughed at him and glanced at the coaling flags that told them how their work progressed. "Six 'undred more to come," they said; " six 'undred more ton. . . ." And when they sailed from Gibraltar, their destination was Catalan Bay, their prospect gun-practice. The ship's company added another memory to their list of war scares, and suffered from the inevitable reaction. II The essential element in gun-practice and range keeping exercises is waiting with nothing to do— waiting till the target is ready, waiting till the fillip's turn comes, waiting while a passing merchant ship fouls the range, waiting while the important people in the controls make abstruse calculations with which the men at the guns have no concern. The monotony is varied by gun-drill, but even gun-drill palls. The hours pass slowly. The eyes stare at the expressionless breech of the gun until, tiring of that, they stare at the red wheel above the ammunition hoist. Often they stare at the bugler as he passes the open door of the casemate, and prayers go up that ultimately he may sound the "Secure." The captain of the gun, sick of the limited topics which can be discussed within the hearing of the officer whose head is in the sighting-hood, produces rags and a tin, and proceeds to polish bright work already immaculate. Then he puts away his rags and tin, and watches the bugler again. Coming into Gibraltar for a week-end, John played in a cricket match, in which, for lack of training, the batting was poor and the bowling without sting. Gunroom Evolutions had long begun again. Krame had forgotten the incident of the " minor defects," and the junior midshipmen were Warts without cease. In Tetuan Bay the natives ashore appeared, to those who watched them through telescopes, to be carrying on warfare. There were rifle flashes and smoke, and bodies of men moving hastily hither and thither. No one cared very much. To the midshipmen it meant something to record in the personal logbooks they submitted each Sunday morning to the Captain. . . . It was in Tetuan Bay, too, perhaps during the warfare, perhaps during some other similar week after peace had been declared, that the ship's company bathed—the officers from the starboard after gangway, the men for'ard from the port lower boom. John, as midshipman of the watch, was on the quarter-deck, watching the clock for the time at which he should recall the men from the water by ordering the bugler to sound the "Retire." Suddenly, on the port quarter, he caught sight of the unmistakable fin. Sharks were not then to be expected in that part of the world. He looked again, this time through a telescope. " Quartermaster, what do you make of that ?" The Quartermaster borrowed the telescope. " Yessir. Shark, sir." John wheeled round. " Bugler! Sound the 'Retire' and sound the 'Double.' Go on sounding it until you are sure that all men in the water have heard. Sound it first to the officers on the starboard side. . . . Boatswain's-mate ! Go and pipe by the lower boom: 'Shark on the port quarter. All hands return to the ship.' Warn the boat." John called for a megaphone and summoned courage to address the Commander, who, in the water, was very much like the rest of mankind. It was bad enough to have sounded the " Retire " at him. "Commander, sir !" The Commander, much to John's surprise, held up his hand to show he had heard, just as John himself, had he been away in a boat, would have held up his hand to indicate attention to the Commander's orders. "Shark on the port quarter, sir !" The Commander raised himself an instant from the water and made a funnel of his hands. " Get the men out," he shouted, and swam towards the ship. The other officers followed him. He met John on the top of the gangway. "Like shouting at the Commander?" he demanded. John had not liked it. He had thought twice about doing it, but it had seemed inevitable. Apparently he had done wrong. " I thought, Sir -----" he began. The Commander grinned and shook the drops from him. "Go on, boy. I'm not an ogre. You did quite right. Very smartly, too." . . . Biographical Information Charles Langbridge Morgan (22 January 1894 – 6 February 1958) was an English-born playwright and novelist of English and Welsh parentage. His maternal grandparents had emigrated to Australia from Pembrokeshire. His paternal grandparents were from Gloucestershire and Devon in England. His parents were married in Australia. His father, Sir Charles Langbridge Morgan was a railway civil engineer, and at one time was President of the Institution of Civil Engineers. Morgan himself was born in Bromley, Kent. Morgan entered the Royal Navy in 1907, at thirteen; he was educated at Osborne and Dartmouth, where he was cadet captain. He then went to sea as a young midshipman, and served in the Atlantic Fleet, and later on the ‘China Station’ in the Far East. His first ship was H.M.S. Good Hope, where he suffered the relentless hazing of young midshipmen then common in the Service: this is described in his first novel, The Gunroom. Later he was transferred to H.M.S. Monmouth, where his superior officer, Christopher Arnold-Forster, provided a kindlier atmosphere and encouraged Morgan’s steadfast desire to be a writer. Arnold-Forster, who was the great-grandson of Dr Arnold of Rugby School, believed in Morgan, and the two became fast friends. Morgan’s father helped him to resign from the Navy in 1914, and he was entered for Brasenose College, Oxford, for the autumn of that year. After the outbreak of war, however, he rejoined the Navy and was sent as a subaltern with the hastily-formed Naval Brigades to the defence of Antwerp. In a confused and catastrophic four-day action, Morgan’s Hawke Battalion found itself first lost, then across the border in neutral Holland, where officers and men were interned in Groningen. Those officers who would not give their word not to attempt to escape were then sent to the ancient and secure fort at Wierickerschans near Bodegraven, a fortress on an artificial island. Here he stayed for around a year, before he and some fellow-officers were released on parole and went to live on the estate of Roosendaal Castle, the home of the aristocratic Van Pallandt family. Both the fort and the castle figure in Morgan’s 1932 novel The Fountain, although the Van Leyden family there portrayed is fictional. It was here that he was introduced to the French language and civilisation then still common in Dutch aristocratic circles, and which became for him a lifelong love. It was here also that he wrote the first draft of The Gunroom. Morgan was interned in Holland until 1917, after which he was allowed to go on leave to England. While crossing to England, however, his ship was sunk and all his belongings with it, including the manuscript of the novel. Leave was extended, and he rewrote The Gunroom; he was in England when the Armistice was signed. In 1919, after some time in hospital, he saw The Gunroom published by A & C Black, and took his place at Brasenose, reading History and becoming president of OUDS, the university Dramatic Society, where he produced Hardy’s The Dynasts and met the author. Through OUDS he met the dramatic critic of The Times, A. B. Walkley, who gave him a job on the editorial staff. After five years, Walkley died, and Morgan took his place as the newspaper’s chief theatre critic. Please note: to avoid opening the book out, with the risk of damaging the spine, some of the pages were slightly raised on the inner edge when being scanned, which has resulted in some blurring to the text and a shadow on the inside edge of the final images. Colour reproduction is shown as accurately as possible but please be aware that some colours are difficult to scan and may result in a slight variation from the colour shown below to the actual colour. In line with eBay guidelines on picture sizes, some of the illustrations may be shown enlarged for greater detail and clarity. The inner hinges are badly cracked: the front hinge has the mull exposed as the pastedown end-paper has peeled back; the rear hinge is cracked at page 345, leaving the last few pages loose: U.K. buyers: To estimate the “packed weight” each book is first weighed and then an additional amount of 150 grams is added to allow for the packaging material (all books are securely wrapped and posted in a cardboard book-mailer). The weight of the book and packaging is then rounded up to the nearest hundred grams to arrive at the postage figure. I make no charge for packaging materials and do not seek to profit from postage and packaging. Postage can be combined for multiple purchases. Packed weight of this item : approximately 800 grams Postage and payment options to U.K. addresses: Details of the various postage options can be obtained by selecting the “Postage and payments” option at the head of this listing (above). Payment can be made by: debit card, credit card (Visa or MasterCard, but not Amex), cheque (payable to "G Miller", please), or PayPal. Please contact me with name, address and payment details within seven days of the end of the auction; otherwise I reserve the right to cancel the auction and re-list the item. Finally, this should be an enjoyable experience for both the buyer and seller and I hope you will find me very easy to deal with. If you have a question or query about any aspect (postage, payment, delivery options and so on), please do not hesitate to contact me. International buyers: To estimate the “packed weight” each book is first weighed and then an additional amount of 150 grams is added to allow for the packaging material (all books are securely wrapped and posted in a cardboard book-mailer). The weight of the book and packaging is then rounded up to the nearest hundred grams to arrive at the shipping figure. I make no charge for packaging materials and do not seek to profit from shipping and handling. Shipping can usually be combined for multiple purchases (to a maximum of 5 kilograms in any one parcel with the exception of Canada, where the limit is 2 kilograms). Packed weight of this item : approximately 800 grams International Shipping options: Details of the postage options to various countries (via Air Mail) can be obtained by selecting the “Postage and payments” option at the head of this listing (above) and then selecting your country of residence from the drop-down list. For destinations not shown or other requirements, please contact me before buying. Due to the extreme length of time now taken for deliveries, surface mail is no longer a viable option and I am unable to offer it even in the case of heavy items. I am afraid that I cannot make any exceptions to this rule. Payment options for international buyers: Payment can be made by: credit card (Visa or MasterCard, but not Amex) or PayPal. I can also accept a cheque in GBP [British Pounds Sterling] but only if drawn on a major British bank. Regretfully, due to extremely high conversion charges, I CANNOT accept foreign currency : all payments must be made in GBP [British Pounds Sterling]. This can be accomplished easily using a credit card, which I am able to accept as I have a separate, well-established business, or PayPal. Please contact me with your name and address and payment details within seven days of the end of the auction; otherwise I reserve the right to cancel the auction and re-list the item. Finally, this should be an enjoyable experience for both the buyer and seller and I hope you will find me very easy to deal with. If you have a question or query about any aspect (shipping, payment, delivery options and so on), please do not hesitate to contact me. Prospective international buyers should ensure that they are able to provide credit card details or pay by PayPal within 7 days from the end of the auction (or inform me that they will be sending a cheque in GBP drawn on a major British bank). Thank you. (please note that the book shown is for illustrative purposes only and forms no part of this auction) Book dimensions are given in inches, to the nearest quarter-inch, in the format width x height. Please note that, to differentiate them from soft-covers and paperbacks, modern hardbacks are still invariably described as being ‘cloth’ when they are, in fact, predominantly bound in paper-covered boards pressed to resemble cloth. Fine Books for Fine Minds I value your custom (and my feedback rating) but I am also a bibliophile : I want books to arrive in the same condition in which they were dispatched. For this reason, all books are securely wrapped in tissue and a protective covering and are then posted in a cardboard container. If any book is significantly not as described, I will offer a full refund. Unless the size of the book precludes this, hardback books with a dust-jacket are usually provided with a clear film protective cover, while hardback books without a dust-jacket are usually provided with a rigid clear cover. The Royal Mail, in my experience, offers an excellent service, but things can occasionally go wrong. However, I believe it is my responsibility to guarantee delivery. If any book is lost or damaged in transit, I will offer a full refund. Thank you for looking. Please also view my other listings for a range of interesting books and feel free to contact me if you require any additional information Design and content © Geoffrey Miller Condition: A detailed description of this item's current condition is given in the listing below but please do not hesitate to contact me if you require any further information., Year Printed: 1919, Fiction Subject: General & Literary Fiction, Binding: Hardback, Author: Charles Langbridge Morgan, Language: English, Publisher: A. & C. Black, Ltd, Place of Publication: London, Special Attributes: 1st Edition

PicClick Insights PicClick Exclusive
  •  Popularity - 173 views, 0.4 views per day, 406 days on eBay. Very high amount of views. 0 sold, 1 available.
  •  Price -
  •  Seller - 6.918+ items sold. 0% negative feedback. Top-Rated Seller! Ships on time with tracking, 0 problems with past sales.
Similar Items